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Buspreneur interview with Dean Rotherham

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Dean Rotherham
Dean Rotherham, founder and director at Shop Beat, is passionate about making things work and will often work into the crazy hours of the morning to insure that they do just that – work!

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I’m passionate about people, technology and the meaningful difference we can make in our world by combining the two. I love a good challenge and am always up for something new that can broaden my knowledge. I enjoy attention to detail and often find myself thundering on into the crazy hours of the morning making “stuff” work. 😉
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I’m excited about the meeting of a diverse and energetic group of minds that view Southern Africa in the same way I do and truly believe now is “the time for Southern Africa”. I’m looking forward to the journey, not only for sparking and sharing ideas that can turn into long lasting friendships and working partnerships, but also a journey whereby we better understand what Southern Africa really “needs”.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    Growth in Southern Africa is a given and with that comes endless opportunities, but much of Southern Africa has been isolated from the rest of the world and this has resulted in its “own” form of development and problems. I think there’s a huge area where Southern Africa can now showcase its own growth to the rest of the world and in parallel, Southern Africa can benefit from development the rest of the world has to offer to solve its problems.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    I would be honest and say I am not a super expert in any one of the specific fields but I am regularly referred to as being the link between ideas and actions. I feel my skills are within the business area and the “design” of business models. I really enjoy “mapping” products and processes into working systems.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    Education is as much a part of your health and with the penetration of mobile devices there’s an opportunity to put a mobile classroom in every child’s hands. I would love to explore this area more and with some basic technology ideas I believe it can happen.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    It’s funny how often special stories start in the bedroom at home … mine is no different. 😉 I started what today is called “Shop Beat” and provide customised audio into the franchise and retail market via a small Box Based Broadcasting solution. It essentially delivers a 100% unique audio feed into any environment without the reliance of permanent internet which is often a “nice to have” in Africa. The generated feed is unique and accommodates hyper-localisation for the specific site.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    I’m sponsoring myself but I guess you could say Shop Beat, my business, is making it possible. 🙂

Buspreneur interview with Samuel Osam Kyemenu-Sarsah

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Samuel Osam Kyemenu-Sarsah

Samuel Osam Kyemenu-Sarsah is a MEST fellow who humbly calls himself an aspiring entrepreneur. Having been involved in Google’s first ever Online Marketing Lab and working with international companies, makes Kyemenu-Sarsah an entrepreneur to be watched!

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am a 24 year old Ghanaian entrepreneur in training, best described by the words ‘passionate’ and ‘persistent’. I strongly believe in the need to leverage technology to build solutions for African problems. My aspiration is to build a globally successful software company that not only solves specific problems on this continent but also creates employment opportunities and serves as a role model for the next generation of entrepreneurs.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    My greatest expectation for StartupBus Africa is to meet like-minded entrepreneurs from different backgrounds who are also passionate about building solutions for Africa. I am looking forward to contributing to the products and solutions that will be created within the 5-day period. Mostly, I’m excited to see how those solutions will be applied not only in the South African region but in other parts of Africa too.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    The statistics speak for themselves: high growth in the African mobile sector, increasing internet penetration and the proliferation of smart devices all indicate the preparedness of Africa to embrace technology-based solutions. On a personal level, I feel there are more opportunities to collaborate with like-minded people in the technology space through events like StartupBus and incubators like MEST in Accra and the iHub in Nairobi.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    My areas of expertise are primarily in web development technologies, business development and online marketing. I have worked on a number of start-ups targeting the events industry, the fashion Industry and news aggregation. I have experience running online marketing campaigns and I was part of Google’s first ever Online Marketing Lab. I also have some experience in the clean energy sector after building a product for a wind energy company in the U.S.A.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    An online health assistance portal built on local payment systems that utilises the expertise of certified health professionals who would engage with the product. This app will enable widespread access to health advice via mobile phones at a much-reduced cost to patients.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    My story is not just mine; it is the story of several young people in Ghana, and to a larger extent, Africa. These young people and I have seen the enormous potential this continent holds and the need to foster that potential to create something amazing. I am also fortunate enough to have spent the past year and a half at MEST, an incredible post-graduate program and incubator which provides training, investment and mentoring for aspiring entrepreneurs in the software industry. MEST has a goal of helping these entrepreneurs create globally successful companies, and to a larger extent, transforming Africa into the next hub for software development.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    As a young African entrepreneur in training, my ability to sponsor a trip of this magnitude is limited. I have begun collecting donations via my GoFundMe campaign and I intend to pitch to additional sponsors to help cover any remaining costs following the campaign. If anyone would like to contribute, I would very much appreciate the support!

Buspreneur interview with Sarah Nahm

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Sarah Nahm studied Comparative Literature at Stanford University before moving into the tech space; she is a designer who is learning to programme/develop. She is excited about the prospects that exist within the mobile payments space; specifically in Africa.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am a designer. I am learning to programme/develop. And I am specialising in data visualisation.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I expect to meet people outside of the Silicon Valley echo chamber.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    Joe Mellin, another buspreneur, passed this opportunity onto me and it was simply too good to pass up.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this experience.
    I am not experienced in any of these areas; rather, my area of expertise is design technology and strategy. I’ve gained through my time at Stanford, Google, and my current job.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    The idea of mobile payments is really exciting. I think that mobile payments really just are more futuristic in Africa than anywhere else in the world. It would be cool to see what marketplaces you can create, bringing something totally new into the world instead of importing more of the old.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I had no intention of studying tech. I stubbornly studied comparative literature – specifically French structuralism. There are parallels between French Structuralism and tech… But then design happened and the chance to be creative and analytical at the same time. Everything is really just a happy accident – even my time at Google!
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors.
    I am sponsoring myself.

Buspreneur interview with Thomas Shaw

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Thomas Shaw, an Australian by origin, has been working on the African continent for a few years now. Shaw has experience in building online marketplaces and technical expertise in operating them. While he has many ideas for how to use technology to solve local problems, Shaw is focused on mobile healthcare solutions.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am originally from Melbourne, Australia with a strong background in HR/Recruitment and IT. I have been working on a number of successful online marketplace projects across Africa for a few years now. From start-up to MVP to multi-million dollar funded businesses, all number 1 in their verticals.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    StartupBus is a great opportunity to use the skills and experience I have gained over the years and apply them to real life problems in the South African region. It will be fantastic to work with like-minded individuals all striving to achieve the same goals.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    Africa is a fantastic, vibrant and rapidly evolving continent. I love it. You only have to look at the statistics on GDP, mobile penetration, increase in disposable income, uptake of mobile money registrations and business growth. Over the past 3 years, I have spent more than 12 months on the ground gaining first hand experience in Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda and South Africa.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise.
    I have a strong skill set in building online marketplaces and technical expertise in the full operation of them including programming, product development, infrastructure architecture and security operations.
    I gained my experience in Australia working in HR, IT recruitment and then moved into Recruitment software and online Job Boards. Over the past few years I used that knowledge to build the number 1 online car classifieds and job board businesses in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Nigeria and Ghana.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    My head is full of ideas, but I believe mobile and phone-to-phone business to be a key part of the future. I would like to focus on mobile healthcare solutions that can directly impact users’ lives.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    —-
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors.
    I am fortunate enough to be sponsored by a number of private investors based in Australia.

Buspreneur interview with Vasili Sofiadelis

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Vasili Sofiadelis is a first generation Greek in South Africa who has transitioned from playing professional soccer in both Greece and South Africa to being a chartered accountant for PwC. Sofiadelis works at PwC in an innovative role; seconded from PwC’s Deal’s team.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am a very passionate person who loves adding value and making a difference to peoples lives. I’m quite innovative in that I’m not a typical accountant… I always wanted to do my own thing and love doing “extraordinary” things, there is no such thing as “it’s not possible”, especially if there is a need!
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I am expecting to meet extremely creative, passionate and innovative people that are also keen to make a difference; no matter what the odds. I am very much looking forward to this experience and am keen to identify ways in which I can contribute/add value to this great initiative.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    African countries are showing great growth and have vast resources. There is also great investment being made in infrastructure from around the world into Africa, which will lead to strong growth across many industries. This, coupled with determined, aspiring and innovative Africans, will see many developments in Africa for the needs of Africans. The time is now- a truly exciting time!
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    I have been involved in several businesses, including running some of my dad’s businesses from a young age (I am now invested in my own restaurants).
    I finished an accounting degree and I’m currently working for PwC, based in the Bandwidth Barn; arguably Africa’s oldest incubator (in the tech start-up space). I’m currently in an innovation role at PwC, seconded from our Deal’s team; which is responsible for performing due diligence, valuations and M&A work across several industries, which includes listed clients.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    Enabling access to medicine in the informal settlements, as opposed to cuing at hospitals (this is especially necessary for diabetes, AIDS and chronic medication).
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I am a proud South African/Greek – first generation Greek). I quit my studies to play professional soccer at 13 years of age and played in the top division in Greece for almost two years. I subsequently, at 27 years old, went back to university to complete my studies, while at the same time playing professional soccer in SA. Once I completed my studies, I again pursued my football and again played overseas. I subsequently qualified as a chartered accountant and I am now on my way to StartupBus Africa! 🙂
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    I am being sponsored by my company, PwC. We are involved in several collaborative initiatives to contribute to the great tech ecosystem in SA – an exciting space indeed.

Buspreneur interview with Cedric Franz

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Cedric Franz has 20 years of experience in software architecture and development in the financial sector. He currently works for Visa and leads a team of 80 who develop products for Visa’s emerging market clientele.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    A software developer at heart, but love all technology. I am always learning new skills and building stuff, currently I am experimenting with quadcopters. Spending time with my family, keeping fit and doing sport is very important to me. I enjoy mountain biking and windsurfing.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I will probably be one of the older people on the bus and hope to share my knowledge and expertise with everyone else. I particularly have a lot of experience in building mobile applications and deploying them into Africa. I am hoping to build networks with entrepreneurs and help them kick-start their projects.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    I was born in Paarl, close to Cape Town and I love Africa. It is extremely important to me to give back and uplift society. I feel I have a lot of know how and expertise to be able build something really useful for society.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    I have worked as a software developer and software architect for over 20 years mostly in the financial sector, but also healthcare and insurance. The majority of this time was leading the development of the Fundamo Mobile Money Platform. This platform is now deployed in over 20 emerging market countries providing financial services to formerly unbanked people. I currently work at Visa heading up a development team of over 80 people building products for Visa in emerging markets.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    Crime is a big problem in South Africa and I have a clever idea to get the community to become involved and to help fight crime by using mobile technology. Energy specifically for lighting and recharging is also a big problem in Africa. I have some ideas for a potential solution.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I love building things. I built a wind turbine from scratch (except the blades), currently I am building quadcopters and other multi-rotors unmanned drones. I have also built a number of smaller projects on RaspberryPi and Arduino.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    I am being sponsored by the company that I work for. I work for Visa Inc., the card processing company.

Buspreneur interview with Joe Mellin

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Joe Mellin, a San Franciscan designer living in Sweden, is experienced in designing web based systems of employment and behaviour change. He has a strong sense of responsibility to create things that benefit humanity by, in part, supporting already existing institutions.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am a designer from San Francisco, currently living in Sweden, who has designed everything from wheel chairs to web based employment systems. I think that working with someone is the best way to get to know them.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I expect to have my skills tested and get inspired by other great entrepreneurs.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    I don’t see Africa as a separate place from the rest of the world. As development and connectives accelerate, the divide between Africa and the rest of the world will fade away.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    My main area of expertise is designing web based systems of employment and behaviour change. I am a student of humanity, how we think, what we need, what invokes our emotions. I studied at Stanford University and co-founded Proven.com. I am now building the next generation of mental health treatment.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    As I have yet to be in SA, it is too early for me to say. What I am most interested in is supporting the institutions of the society that enable long term growth. These can be anything from property rights, to the ability to open a business. I think that helping strengthen these institutions is the best way towards long term prosperity.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I was lucky enough to have been born in a country where I have great opportunity. The rest of my story is simply fulfilling the responsibility that comes with that great opportunity. I believe that to do that I need to create scalable systems that benefit humanity.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    I am sponsoring myself.

Buspreneur interview with Jabulani Mpofu

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Jabulani Mpofu, being sponsored by Muzinda Umuzi Tech Hub, is the co-founder of neolab. He thinks out the box; a result of minimal resources, he says. His out-the-box thinking is evident in his co-creation of neolab in a car during school holidays.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I am an extrovert with a very loud and nearly obnoxious personality; you will either like me or wish me dead. Lol! I love learning, acquiring knowledge and applying it to creating and designing systems. As an entrepreneur I am obsessed with creating value for the person on the ground and monetising from corporates.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I am expecting to build awesome and cool things in a charged-up, high energy and creative environment. I expect to learn a vast amount and to meet and network with powerful and inspiring people on and off the bus. Also, I expect to contribute Ideas and skills in building a product of commercial and social value. I expect to be a part of a powerful team for the bus and beyond.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    Africa as a continent lacks greatly in terms of financial resources and infrastructure, while others may think that our scourge; I think that is the driving force for the new generation, cost effective, efficient technology sprouting up all across Africa. With minimal resources you are able to think without a box, it’s too expensive to have one. At my start-up, neolab, our development process has been shaped greatly by this. Once Takunda (co-founder) and I stayed over at school during holidays for the sake of cutting living expenses and bills and for the longest time our primary working location was our car, no office. Africa right now has a proactive, creative, budding generation of technology entrepreneurs and developers; inspired by the successes of and the doors and possibilities that have been created by the current generation of titans like Strive Masiiwa, Aliko Dangote and Patrice Motsepe. The energy and possibilities for social and commercial technological innovation have never been higher.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    Mobile and web development. I started programming when I was in high school; most of what I have learnt is through internet forums, tutorials and building things. After high school I started studying Electronic Engineering, and this has greatly formalised and standardised my technique. I co-founded neolab with my friend Takunda and since then I have learnt a great deal about what industry and corporates expect form software products.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    3 words: community, collaboration and decentralisation. We have few medical specialists in Africa and most people stay in rural, marginalised areas. I have the idea to create professional medical communities that can enable doctors and healthcare workers to collaborate on diagnostics and decentralise their knowledge. A nurse or doctor in a marginalised area can collect patient data and medical imagery with a smartphone/cellphone app and post it to a strict standards and curated online community of professionals that can make recommendations and assist in making a diagnosis. With strict standards, feedback, checks and balances; this could greatly increase the reach of professional healthcare services.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I have always loved creative problem solving and maths. In fact, early in high school I conquered the national Zimaths mathematics talent search. Growing up we didn’t have a computer at home, so when I discovered computer programming, fiddling on my aunt’s computer during one school holiday, everything fell into place. Finally I could use my creative mathematical problem solving skills to solve problems in the real world. This first discovery of computers and programming has been such an integral part of many things I do. Since starting college, I have co-founded two organisations for introducing computers and teaching basic computer skills, development and design to disadvantaged kids.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    am being sponsored by Muzinda Umuzi Tech Hub, Zimbabwe’s first tech hub. This new organisation is doing great things for technology in Zimbabwe, connecting and supporting budding new developers, tech entrepreneurs and tech companies in Zimbabwe.

Buspreneur interview with Zandile Lambu

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If Zandile Lambu fails, she cries about it that evening, and the next morning she gets back in the game! She is new to the tech space but already has an awesome idea about a medical record creation and storage app for the African health sector… Lambu is an up-and-comer to be watched!

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    I’m a starting tech-preneur looking to find her feet in an awesome industry. Love: God, family, music, internet, mobile devices and movies; in that order. Hate: discrimination, corruption and sloppy handshakes…in that order.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I view this as an educational tour and gateway to the next level. As much as I look forward to the exhilarating adrenaline rush and the long hours with little sleep in the bus, I endeavor to learn as much as I possibly can from my peers and mentors. I look forward to stretching myself to do more than I have imagined myself capable of. This experience will be vital when I venture out on my own as it will allow me to create networks I could never have created on my own.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    We need lasting solutions in Africa to improve the lives of people and grow our agro economies into service-based, tech-driven economies. The penetration rate of mobile phones has created vast opportunities to develop innovative and disruptive technologies. Five hundred million connections in 2013 alone, is amazing! Mobile network operators (MNOs) have done a great job in educating people on how to use a mobile phone as well as demonstrating the need for and the advantages of having one. Unfortunately, most people might never be able to own a PC, desktop or even a smartphone. The African market is therefore a unique one as it requires customised solutions. Technology is an effective tool which should be used to develop solutions for the problems common to Southern African societies amongst them: health, energy, education and poverty. Not only are we lagging behind as Africa but we desperately need solutions to the issues that continue to haunt us both in our sleep and when we are awake. If not now, then when?
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    Having worked in the telecommunications industry for three years; my natural bias is towards mobile technology, specifically product development. In the last 13 months, I’ve been involved in developing portable solar products.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    Most of Southern Africa still relies on manual data capturing and physical record filing as computerisation of systems is still a challenge. All medical information is kept in silos and there is no medical history available outside the visited institution. The solution to this is a medical record creation and storage app which is SMS-based. The ability to capture and store patients’ information from, for example, a clinic in the remotest village in Africa using a simple cellphone device via SMS would create a centralised database; this information would in-turn be used by medical practitioners to access patients’ medical history. Health organisations, medical insurance companies, the media, research institutions, etc. would have to pay for access to any statistics and related demographic reports. Not only will this help doctors in administering treatment; it will also inform governments, health officials, medicinal manufacturers, and donors of areas which need urgent attention and types of drugs to manufacture and/or import. Most health organisations rely on-the-ground runners who access areas manually to collect information from villagers and clinics. This app will allow organisations to commit their resources to more pressing issues.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    I was born amongst girls hence, the name Zandile; yet, I continue to find myself in a male dominated industry. Less than 30% of my college class was female, and with the move into the corporate world, the numbers kept decreasing. The odds never seem to be on my side but I never pay attention. I have failed more than I have succeeded but each success always cancels out the failures. Whenever I fail at something, I go home and cry myself to sleep; I wake up the next morning and try again. I don’t settle, I fight, and stay in the game. I have learnt over the years to grab with both hands every opportunity to learn something new; StartupBus Africa is no different. It started with an email and I’m glad I jumped at the opportunity. My special story is still being written…
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    My sponsor is Hypercube Zimbabwe.

Buspreneur interview with Thuto Paul Gaotingwe

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Thuto Paul Gaotingwe started his romance with technology in 2003 when he had his first interaction with a computer at 15 years old. He has his very own secret recipe for a successful project/innovation; no doubt, making him a valuable asset for the StartupBus Africa buspreneur team.

  1. Who are you? Describe yourself in 3 sentences.
    My name is Thuto Paul Gaotingwe. I am an entrepreneur, software developer, and designer who is motivated and inspired by developing software solutions that are relevant to my community.
  2. What do you expect from your participation on the bus?
    I expect to learn a lot about building an awesome start-up that offers something of great value to a customer.
  3. Why Africa? Why now?
    Why Africa… Oh my! There are a lot of problems/opportunities and a lot of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) graduates without jobs in Africa. Right-now the African population is growing at a fast rate with 70% of the people below 30 years and half of them unemployed. There has never been a better time than now to teach African youth to develop sustainable businesses by solving problems in our societies using the power of ICT. Also, a lot of Information Technology (IT) giants like Microsoft, Google, IBM, etc. are starting to invest heavily in Africa more especially in the youth by providing things like software, cloud, and app store access. This really cuts down the costs of developing an innovative IT-based business.
  4. What is your area of expertise – mobile development, healthcare, or the energy sector? Please talk a little bit about how you gained this expertise…
    Mobile development. I am a very good web developer/designer (I develop with .NET). I started learning mobile development in early 2011 as more of my clients started demanding web apps that could also be used as mobile apps. So, I started to learn more about developing for jQueryMobile, Window Phone and PhoneGap.
  5. Please share an idea for a technology (mobile, health, energy) that can solve a problem/s local to the South African region.
    I have an awesome idea for a mobile app that can help a farmer to manage his/her farming costs. Southern Africa is known to have lot of farmers (commercial, subsistence in livestock, arable) and I think they could benefit a lot from a very simple mobile app that could track finances, show statistical analysis, print-out reports, etc.
  6. Everyone has a special story. What is yours?
    My story is a short great love story between a guy and technology. What’s interesting about technology, to me, is its relationship with people. The first time I used a computer was in February 2003. I was 15 years old at the time and I was thrilled, I instantly knew that somehow my awesome future was going to be tied to a computer. I created a lot of great projects/apps with MS access during my junior and senior school years. As I got to university I started to learn more about problem solving using code, the importance of the people/audience element in any IT solution. Now as a graduate and entrepreneur, I have my own recipe for a successful IT project/innovation. My secret ingredients are: Thuto Paul Gaotingwe, the problem, an awesome team, my laptop, the internet, and the customer/user.
  7. Are you sponsoring yourself or do you have sponsors? Please tell us about your sponsors…
    I am sponsoring myself.